The Americans Season 3

Premiere Date, Episode Guide

The Americans season 3 started airing on Wednesday, January 28, 2015. Get a brief email if and when the next season is announced. Make sure to come back to watchtvonline.io where we’ll have season recap and discussion.

List of Episodes

S3E1 EST Men

S3E2 Baggage

S3E3 Open House

S3E4 Dimebag

S3E5 Salang Pass

S3E6 Born Again

S3E7 Walter Taffet

S3E8 Divestment

S3E9 Do Mail Robots Dream of Electric Sheep?

S3E10 Stingers

S3E11 One Day in the Life of Anton Baklanov

S3E12 I Am Abassin Zadran

most recent episode S3E13 March 8, 1983

How many episodes are in season 3 of The Americans?

The season consists of 13 episodes.

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Critics Reviews

    Not all that long into the third season of The Americans, Elizabeth Jennings (Keri Russell) remembers a moment from her formative years in the Soviet Union, of her mother casually dismissing her dead husband as a deserter to the communist cause. It’s a critical point in the formation of Elizabeth’s ironclad nationalism, the same one that leads her to groom her daughter, Paige (Holly Taylor), as a sleeper agent for Mother Russia. Exactly how we pass history and personal wisdom onto our children, and just how these notions are ultimately expressed, is part and parcel of the myriad psychological, sociological, and political ruminations that series creator Joe Weisberg and the show’s writers continue to toil over. Not all that long into the third season of The Americans, Elizabeth Jennings (Keri Russell) remembers a moment from her formative years in the Soviet Union, of her mother casually dismissing her dead husband as a deserter to the communist cause. It’s a critical point in the formation of Elizabeth’s ironclad nationalism, the same one that leads her to groom her daughter, Paige (Holly Taylor), as a sleeper agent for Mother Russia. Exactly how we pass history and personal wisdom onto our children, and just how these notions are ultimately expressed, is part and parcel of the myriad psychological, sociological, and political ruminations that series creator Joe Weisberg and the show’s writers continue to toil over. - by Slant Magazine - Season 3 [Chris Cabin]

    And, most important of all, Philip and Elizabeth do battle over Paige’s soul, now that their leaders at KGB headquarters want them to start grooming Paige for service. One parent is ambivalent about bringing Paige into the spy business, the other isn’t. If you know the series well, you can guess which one is which. As Elizabeth and Philip Jennings, Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys are perfectly matched — the robot and the rogue — as they play mind games with each other, and with Paige. When “The Americans” returns to FX on Wednesday night for season three, it will continue to radiate contemporary political relevance. This extraordinary drama, about Russian undercover spies in the 1980s suburbs of Washington, D.C., features the Reagan era as an important moment in a pair of international relationships that continue to aggravate and concern us. - by Boston Globe [Matthew Gilbert]

    "The Americans" remains one of prime time's best series, the only negatives at this point being how complicated the plotting is, to the degree at which we almost need a flow chart to keep up. It's a headache, but a great one to have. So far, Elizabeth Jennings (Keri Russell) of FX's "The Americans" has successfully walked a line of secrets, keeping her daughter and son from knowing that she and their father, Philip (Matthew Rhys), are Soviet "sleeper" spies deeply embedded in Reagan-era Washington, D.C. With years of practice (the kids were born in America), Elizabeth and Philip have a lie for every occasion. - by St. Louis Post-Dispatch [Gail Pennington]

    The genius of the question lies within how much it entails. Most parents would say they’d do anything to protect their family, but Elizabeth and Philip have to face that question more often than traditional couples. Paige’s fate is tied to not only the future of both Russia and America, but her parents’ happiness and their marriage’s longevity. As he did for the first two seasons, Weisberg has crafted a scenario requiring a rapid reaction from all the characters involved, upping the stakes and elevating the repercussions, but one that does not diminish the possibility for bountiful returns. Too many series rely on twists so heavily their designs become disposable, resulting in a downgrade in quality after a just a season or two. (Even “Homeland” saw a dip in Season 3.) Not here. “The Americans” is only getting better with age, answering its questions as it builds upon them — even if the solutions don’t come easy. After resolving that the good outweighed the bad — in a rather brilliant example of the “love conquers all” mentality — Season 2 brought about a new challenge for the suddenly authentic couple. What happens to a real family built around falsities? As their children grew older, they were also more exposed to their parents’ secret world. A couple became a family, but what happens to the couple when the family is threatened?  - by indieWire [Ben Travers]

    But what does that amount to, exactly? For the purposes of that discussion, let’s put aside the tonally broader, plot-hole-ridden first season. Everything the show is interested in — spy-thriller action and suspense; the uncomfortable eroticism of the Jennings’ undercover work; secondary characters like FBI Agent Stan Beeman, the Soviet agents of the Rezidentura, and the Jennings’ kids; the steely, wiry physicality of Russell and Rhys that makes their characters so convincingly commanding even buried under pounds of big glasses, bad wigs, and spirit gum — got tighter and sharper in Season Two, to the point where few of the first season’s flaws remained. And just as Season Two’s masterful plotting fixed the first season’s wonkiness, Season Three may well be poised to solve this larger problem in turn. Last season’s overarching plot — revealed so slowly and methodically that watching it unfold felt like unwrapping some hugely expensive gourmet chocolate — saw the Soviets begin a program in which the children of their sleeper agents will be turned into agents too. The initial attempt bore bitter fruit indeed: a hormonal teenager, fucked up by the revelation that his life was a lie, fell in love with his handler and murdered his parents to be with her, setting off a chain of events that nearly destroyed the entire network. Meanwhile, Philip and Elizabeth can barely handle their teenage daughter Paige’s involvement in a hippy-dippy church group. The cost would exact from this poor kid is screamingly obvious — which makes the question of whether her parents will go through with her recruitment a more direct line to the moral dilemma at the heart of the show than it’s ever offered before. The sharpest material in tonight’s episode explored the suspicion that Paige’s potential induction into the organization has engendered in the Jennings’ marriage, with Philip wondering if Elizabeth’s outreach to their kid is good parenting or mere spycraft. That’s an ethical faultline a good show can pry apart and poke around in for a good long time. - by New York Observer [Sean T. Collins]

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